The Inertia Editorial Intern

4. Second Beach, Port St. Johns, South Africa: Many people are drawn to Second Beach by the opportunity of cage diving with Great Whites. While intriguing, this adventure involves luring sharks near the cages with bloody carcasses, leading the sharks to associate humans with food. Since the introduction of cage diving in Second Beach, shark attacks have skyrocketed. Lifeguards on the beach can only be seen for two months out of the year, and even if they happen to be on duty during an attack, they don’t have adequate equipment to help victims. In the past six years, there have been six fatal attacks. Many victims were reported swimming or surfing close to the shore. Fundile Nogumla, the only survivor of a Second Beach attack in the past seven years, was wading in waist deep water when a shark attacked him.

Fundile Nogumla, who was attacked in March 2013, fought the shark off with his fists until he was able to stagger out of the water.

Fundile Nogumla, who was attacked in March 2013, fought the shark off with his fists until he was able to stagger out of the water. Photo: Shark Year

5. Reunion Island: With ten shark attacks in the last two years, three of which have been fatal, Reunion Island is atop the world’s worst shark attack locations. Recently, the government issued a ban on surfing in Reunion Island due to the frequency at which people were being attacked. Some folks reckon the frequency with which these attacks occur is due to the marine reserve created six years ago which attracts hungry sharks to the area in search of their next meal.

In efforts to ban surfing, the government released this statement: “An immediate prohibition of swimming, surfing and bodyboarding within the coastal strip of 300 meters from shore in the department of Reunion until October 1st, 2013. These activities are only allowed within the shallow ‘lagoon’ and supervised areas as determined by the Prefecture. Beachgoers who do not comply with the restrictions will be subject to a fine of 38 Euros ($50 U.S. dollars).” They also instituted a culling process by which they have set out to trim the number of sharks by 90–an inhumane practice, claim some. Others believe this might be the ticket to decreasing attacks in the area. Time will tell as October 1st marks the date the ban is lifted.

Photo: Lia Barrett

This won’t be happening in Reunion Island for a little while. Photo: Lia Barrett

6. Makena Beach, Maui: For this Maui beach, it’s not necessarily the number of attacks that’s frightening, but rather the nature of them. Tiger sharks frequent the coast looking to feed on turtles swimming near the surface, which is, of course, where people swim and surf. There have been eight attacks statewide this year so far, and 10 were reported in 2012. Just last month, Makena Beach made headlines across the nation when a German woman, who was snorkeling about 100 yards off the coast, was attacked and lost her arm. Jana Lutteropp, 20, died one week after the attack in the hospital. Though unsure of what kind of shark attacked, Hawaiian officials plan to study tiger shark movements around Maui over the next two years.

A “Shark Sighted” sign is posted on the Makena Beach after Lutteropp is attacked offshore.

A “Shark Sighted” sign is posted on the Makena Beach after Lutteropp is attacked offshore. Photo: MauiTV News

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