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7. Boa Viagem, Pernambuco, Brazil: Since Brazil began keeping track of shark attacks in 1992, 57 people have been attacked. Of those 57 attacks, around 20 have been fatal, and about 40 percent of the 57 attacks have occurred at Boa Viagem. The most recent fatal attack occurred this past July. Bruna Gobi, 18, was fatally bitten by a bull shark before lifeguards could get her out of the water. She made it to the hospital before succumbing to her injuries after doctors amputated her leg. Lawmakers recommended a ban on swimming in the area after Gobi’s attack. Before this attack, the last fatal one had occurred in 2006. Just before that fatal attack, surfing had been banned off the coastline because of the alarming number of non-fatal attacks. The high number of attacks is blamed on overdevelopment and overfishing in the area, leading to sharks having less and less natural resources to eat.

Lifeguards try to pull Gobi out of the water as quickly as possible after the attack.

Lifeguards try to pull Gobi out of the water as quickly as possible after the attack. Photo: Huffington Post | YouTube

8. Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt: In December 2010, five snorkelers were attacked over a span of six days. On December 1, 2010, four beachgoers were seriously injured within minutes of each other. Five days later, on December 6, a German woman was killed. Each victim was snorkeling or wading near shore when they were attacked. Makos and oceanic whitetips were cited as the species of sharks responsible for the attacks. In response to the attacks, officials closed the beaches for over a week, issued rules for swimming in the water and captured and killed dozens of sharks. Overfishing, sheep carcasses dumped into the sea and reports of snorkelers hand-feeding sharks to get them close to their clients have all been cited as possible explanations for the quick spike in attacks. One year later, two British tourists reported seeing a shark feasting on a human body while out on a dive boat. They were asked to keep quiet so as not to further destroy the resort that suffered tourism losses after the five attacks one year ago.

A woman is pulled onto a dock after a shark attacks her in December 2010.

A woman is pulled onto a dock after a shark attacks her in December 2010. Photo: Daily Mail UK

9. Surf Beach, Vandenberg, California: This part of the California coast is home to hundreds of seals. As a strong seal haul-out beach, Surf Beach is practically guaranteed to have a large population of sharks. The most common shark spotted off the California coast has been the Great White. Once those beasts reach around ten feet in length, they start to feed on sea mammals, especially seals. In October 2010, a student at the University of California, Santa Barbara, was attacked and killed off the coast while boogie boarding with a friend. Only 19 years old, Lucas Ransom had his leg bitten off by a Great White. Almost exactly two years later, in October 2012, Francisco Solorio Jr., 39, was surfing when a shark attacked him. Although his friends pulled him out and immediately attempted first aid, paramedics pronounced Solorio dead at the scene. Experts say that the shark likely mistook Solorio for prey.

Franciso Solorio Jr.’s surfboard shows the bite of a shark looking for food.

Francisco Solorio Jr.’s surfboard shows the bite of a shark looking for food. Photo: Fox News

10. Garden Island (Sydney), Australia: After a short pause in attacks, the sharks seem to have steadily begun attacking once again. In August 2013, Paul de Gelder, a highly trained diver, was swimming off the coast of Garden Island when a ten-foot Bull Shark attacked him. The shark pulled de Gelder under water and shredded through his arm and leg. Though he managed to escape the shark and swim to a boat, de Gelder ended up losing a hand and a leg that day.

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Paul de Gelder speaks at a UN conference in New York. Photo: Australian Geographic

Paul de Gelder speaks at a UN conference in New York. Photo: Australian Geographic

Correction appended: An earlier version of this story misstated facts and statistics regarding the number of shark attacks at Fletcher Cove, San Diego, California, and the location of shark attacks in various parts of Australia.

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