Martin’s 5: Battle for the Beach explores the Surfrider Foundation’s fight to keep America’s beaches open to the public through the lens of a monumental court case in San Mateo County, California that will have larger implications on beach access issues in the United States. The short film is the second in The Inertia’s documentary series.

“We wanted to provide a snapshot of one of the many ongoing beach access campaigns Surfrider is championing,” said Zach Weisberg, Co-Producer and Publisher at The Inertia. “We hope this film raises awareness for beach access issues nationwide and motivates people to make an impact by getting involved in that conversation.”

Join the fight to ensure America’s beaches are free for all to enjoy by connecting with Surfrider’s San Mateo Chapter and getting involved on the local level, or by logging on to www.surfrider.org/access and making a donation to support Surfrider’s fight for beach access by clicking the button below:

Support Surfrider Foundation

Special thanks to the Surfrider Foundation, Director/Producer Richard Yelland, Willie Tipp, David Ortuno, and Curtis Birch Inc. for their tireless efforts and creative direction, Sharon Jones and the Dap Kings for permitting us to use their gorgeous rendition of Woodie Guthrie’s “This Land is Your Land, and the beautiful imagery provided by Jim Patterson Photography.


  • Chuck Allison

    I used this vid today in my marine science class to open a discussion on access…….the kids decided that going surfing or fishing or shelling every day till the thing is resolved was a good plan…..it the issue in the public eye and speed the whole process.

    • TheInertia

      We love to hear that, Chuck. Thanks for sharing it! Hopefully, it inspires some productive dialog.

  • Joe M

    It seems like the beach access people are fighting the wrong battle. If there is no law that requires private owners to allow people to go across their land, the surfers are in the wrong to think that bullying the man with public pressure is justified. He should be able to count on laws being upheld like anyone else.

    Instead, they should be going through the legislative process to establish some kind of updated public accommodation requirement for certain situations when the beach is otherwise difficult to access.

    It should be noted that other private property like the Hollister Ranch have made beach access difficult in some areas for years. Surfers have had to get there by boat. I don’t see how this stretch of beach is any different.